Category Archives: FBI

Espionage suspect totally thought messages to Chinese intel were deleted

On June 22, Kevin Patrick Mallory was brought before a US federal judge for his first hearing on charges that he sold highly classified documents to a Chinese intelligence agent. These documents, which are considered "National Defense Information," included at least one Top Secret document and three classified as Secret, were found on a phone Mallory had been provided by his Chinese contacts. Mallory, a 60-year-old former Central Intelligence Agency employee living in Leesburg, Va., had thought the documents were in messages that had been deleted automatically from the device. Mallory faces life in prison if convicted.

Mallory, an independent consultant, had previously been an employee of "various government agencies" as well as several defense contractors. An Army veteran, Mallory worked at the State Department from 1987 to 1990. And according to the Washington Post, Mallory was also confirmed to have worked at the CIA, among other places. According to the FBI, Mallory was also an Army reservist during this time, and served on active duty for several deployments. For much of his career, he held a Top Secret clearance, which was rescinded when he left government service in 2012.

According to the indictment, at some point during his service at the unnamed agency or at a defense contractor, Mallory—who is fluent in Mandarin—secreted out a collection of documents. Mallory told the FBI that while in China doing consulting work for a state-funded think tank in March and April of this year, he was approached by individuals he then believed to be with China's intelligence service and was given a phone to communicate with them secretly. During an interview with the FBI on May 24, FBI agent Stephen Green recounted in affidavit requesting an arrest warrant:

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Highlights from James Comey’s first testimony since Trump fired him

 Today, the former FBI director who ran afoul of President Trump appeared before the Senate Intelligence Committee in its ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. It was James Comey’s first appearance since he was fired from his role as the director of the FBI. Providing a useful framework for the hearing, Comey issued a written opening… Read More

Where to watch the James Comey testimony online and on TV

 Former FBI Director James Comey is set to give testimony in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee regarding his relationship with Trump during the Russia/Mike Flynn investigation. Yesterday, his prepared statement went public, blowing up the news cycle with a seven-page document that tells the story of Trump’s pressure for loyalty from the FBI. Needless to say, people are pretty… Read More

Senators want FBI to find out who attacked net neutrality comment system

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Sergey Balakhnichev)

Five Democratic senators today asked the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to find out who was behind attacks on the Federal Communications Commission's public commenting system. The FCC website failed on May 8 just as many people were trying to submit comments on the commission's plan to gut net neutrality rules.

"The public comment period associated with the FCC’s rulemaking authority is a critical part of the regulatory process and the primary way for the American people to make their voices heard," senators Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), Al Franken (D-Minn.), Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Ed Markey (D-Mass.), and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) wrote in a letter to FBI Acting Director Andrew McCabe. "The reported cyberattack on the FCC’s Electronic Comment Filing System is extremely troubling given that it threatens to stifle the public’s ability to weigh in on these issues."

"We ask that the FBI prioritize this matter and investigate the source of this attack," the senators also wrote. "This particular attack may have denied the American people the opportunity to contribute to what is supposed to be a fair and transparent process, which in turn may call into question the integrity of the FCC‘s rulemaking proceedings."

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