Category Archives: Chrome OS

How to install Linux on a Chromebook (and why you should)

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Chromebooks are one of the most secure devices you can give a non-technical end user, and at a price point few can argue with, but that security comes with a privacy trade off: you have to trust Google, which is part of the NSA's Prism programme, with your data in the cloud.

Even those who put their faith in the company's rusty "don’t be evil" mantra may find Chromebook functionality limiting—if you want more than Google services, Netflix, some other Web apps, and maybe the Android app store, then you're out of luck.

Geeky users willing to engage in some entry-level hackery, however, can install Linux on their Chromebook and unleash the Power of Torvalds™.

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VMware and Google extend partnership to include Chrome OS management in Workspace One

 One of the beautiful things about owning a Google Chromebook laptop is the surprising lack of maintenance involved. The browser is essentially the OS and you connect to applications via the cloud. Everything gets updated automatically. Easy, peasy right? Well, it gets a bit more complicated when you bring a device into a mixed environment in the enterprise, and VMware announced a partnership… Read More

The $999 Surface Laptop is Microsoft’s expensive answer to Chromebooks

 Microsoft just revealed the newest Surface model and it’s aimed directly at the education market. Called the Surface Laptop, this is the notebook Microsoft hopes schools will buy instead of a Chromebooks. But unlike other Surface models, it does not run the traditional desktop version of Windows, though. The $999 Surface Laptop runs Windows 10 S, a new streamlined operating system… Read More

Microsoft takes on Chrome OS with new Windows 10 S

(credit: Johannes Hemmerlein)

NEW YORK—In a move to curtail Google's growing presence in the education market, Microsoft has announced a new Windows variant: Windows 10 S.

Previously rumored as "Windows 10 Cloud," the new Windows variant is defined by one specific design decision: it can only run and install applications that are obtained through the Windows Store. Both applications are built using Microsoft's new Universal Windows Program (UWP) framework, and traditional Win32 applications ported to the Store using the Desktop Bridge (formerly known as "Project Centennial") will be permitted, but Win32 applications that use their own installers will not function.

The S does not stand for anything officially, but it might reasonably be read as implying "school" or perhaps even "store."

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